Murder in the Zambezi

The crashes of Air Rhodesia Flight RH825 and Air Rhodesia Flight RH827 were two of the deadliest aviation incidents in the history of Zimbabwe—and they weren’t accidents. In this in-depth exploration of a little-known piece of southern African history, Ian Pringle tells a true story of terrorism, sabotage, and survival.

Pringle, who lived in Rhodesia at the time of the crashes, collected interviews from survivors, witnesses, pilots, ground staff, accident investigators, family members, and experts. These testimonies reveal stories of heroism and courage in the wake of a major tragedy.

Air Rhodesia Flight RH825 was the first civilian plane ever to be shot down by a Russian surface-to-air guided missile. The surviving passengers tell the story of the crash and its horrific aftermath. Five months later, Air Rhodesia Flight RH827 was downed in the same way. This time, there were no survivors.

In addition to presenting vivid first-person testimonies, Pringle examines how the attacks—and the ensuing collective rage of the Rhodesian people at those responsible—contributed to the instability of the country. He shows how these tragedies indirectly led to the rise of Robert Mugabe and laid the groundwork for a very different future for the African nation.

 

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***** Paperback now available in South Africa *****

Click here for Extracts from the book∗

Click here for audio of Dean da Costa’s sermon at the Viscount Memorial Service

Latest Press Reviews – Murder in the Zambezi

“Pringle has written a fast-paced book that reads like a thriller and will have most readers gripped, particularly the first half.” Vivien Horler, WEEKEND ARGUS Sunday Edition 19 August 2018 Click here to view Vivien’s review

“Murder in the Zambezi is a page turner.” IOL BOOKS REVIEW. Click here for review.

“Murder In The Zambezi reads like a thriller, except that it’s true.” Brian Joss, THE GREMLIN. Click here for Brian’s review. 

“It is the innocent civilians who are lost to the past, nameless except to those friends and families who cared for them. The brilliance of this work by Pringle lies in its countering of that position.” John Harvey, READ OF THE WEEK, NORTHERN NEWS. Click here for John’s review